Skymetric

The word skymetric is a construction composed by: sky and -metric (geometric). The subject highlights the decontextualization of places and architectural spaces in order to alter the natural structure. These places considered have in common the fact to be all completely square, regular and schematic, so achieving geometric shots in a minimalist context, where the simplicity and cleanliness reign supreme.

Places

Mark Bramley’s pictures raise a feeling of desolation. In each picture there are obvious clues that indicate mankind was here someday, but they seem long gone. The places where Bramley (UK) takes his photos seem to concentrate in the USA. His style is peculiar. Although people could always be around the corner, he never tends to focus on them. Instead, empty landscapes or objects tell the story humans don’t.

Norilsk

These photographs were taken along the outskirts of the city Norilsk. Life here collides with urban sprawl, and the fragility of nature. Within the constancy of human presence, Gronsky photographs recreational moments deep in forested areas or open beaches, in secluded niches or general gathering places.

Transformation

Roman Sakovich is a UK based Photographer. His work investigates the development of an evolving post-Soviet society and the attendant cultural changes in a progressive world. It awakened our interest due to its extravagant clean style and his stunning sceneries. Although they show virtually ‘normal’ urban places, they mediate a special atmosphere and dramatic unique.

A Van in the Sea

In 2011 Alessandro decided to buy an old (but super well constructed) motorhome, Hymer 1983 and move it along the south coast of Portugal in some of his favorite places along the european coast. He did that to be able to realise his personal photography project. This is a small series of images Alessandro took when going to bed over the course of 2013.

Belgian autumn

In the autumn of 1985, a series of brutal robberies and murders were committed. ‘The Gang of Nivelles’ were known for being heavily armed and not being so interested in the loot. In total, 28 victims died because of the gang. The most curious part in this case: in spite of a thorough police investigation (a file of almost three million pages), found evidence and witness accounts, the criminals were never busted. Jan Rosseel, a victims’ son, remained with questions. These dark shots are based on some of the clues that Rosseel has found over the years.

Into Nothingness

Paul Bauer is a graphic designer and self-taught photographer based in Vienna, Austria. He graduated from the School of Applied Sciences in Graz and currently works as a part-time freelancer. Paul took a series of pictures on top of the “Dachstein-Glacier”, one of the highest spots in Austria.

In the Rain

Cristophe Jacrot is a French photographer who is fascinated by skywater. Drops of rain on windows or rain falling on the ground turns into art when Jacrot has his camera at hand. The raindrops on a window makes bright colors blur and reflect in a special way.
Secret tip from us: hold your eyelashes against each other, it’s like you’re looking at a painting. Cool.

Lost Villages

Erosion is a natural process that mankind can not stop. In the history of the Holderness coast (North East England) many villages have vanished in the sea. Neil A. White is fascinated by how inhabitants stay put untill the sea literally eats their backyard. As a frequent visitor of the coastline, White sees it changing right before his eyes. He states: “This really does bring the speed of erosion into reality”.

Amazon Unpacked

For Ben Roberts latest series ‘Amazon Unpacked’ he was sent on assignment by the Financial Times Weekend Magazine to photograph people and places in and around Rugeley, UK. As a former coal mining town, Rugeley has struggled during the current recession, with high unemployment being a particular problem. The arrival of Amazon to occupy a huge warehouse in the town was originally seen as being a boost to the local economy, but has it turned out that way?

Jules Vincent

Jules Vincent is a photographer who points his camera towards buildings and other architectural objects. His main focusses are lines and reflections. The angle of the shots pull the objects out of their surroundings. This makes it hard to see the context of the shot, which is interesting.

Eurasisme

Moving a capital city is an important decision. In 1998, Kazakhstan unveiled its new capital and Almaty lost its status to Astana, located 1300 kilometers up North. 
As the world’s most recent capital city after Pyinmana (Myanmar), Astana is also the symbol of a new start, a unique initiative in the Post-Soviet region. Fabrice Fouillet’s project ‘Eurasism’ depicts a landscape coined by old Soviet architecture and new developing modern buildings.

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